HOW THE JUDGING WORKS

Advertising Competition

Jury: 9
Days of Judging: 3 (plus additional time screening prior to arriving at our offices)

The nine jurors work in screening teams of three. Judges are not permitted to vote on work they were directly involved in. Each category is distributed into three parts so each group screens one-third of the entries. Print entries are spread out on tables by category. Most categories require several room setups. Each juror views the entries independently. Any juror can put an entry into the final voting by picking it up from the table. Television, radio and digital entries are selected by checking an "in" or "out" column on prepared scoring sheets. For finals, all nine jurors work as a single team. In one hall, print entries are again spread out on tables by category. Two paper cups, one white and one red, with slots cut in the bottom, are placed upside down to the right of each entry. White cups are for "in" votes, red cups for "out" Each juror votes with different colored ceramic tiles by putting his or her tile in the appropriate cup. After all the jurors finish voting on print, they move to another hall for television, radio or digital files. Again, voting is done by each juror checking the "in" or "out" column on scoring sheets. Meanwhile, in the print hall, if the votes do not total nine, a check of the tile colors tells the Communication Arts staff which juror has inadvertently missed that piece and he or she is called back to vote. After the judges make their selections, their votes are tallied. A simple majority is usually required for a finalist to be selected a winner.

Design Competition

Jury: 5
Days of Judging: 3

The five jurors work in screening teams of two. Judges are not permitted to vote on work they were directly involved in. Each category is distributed into two parts so each group screens one-half of the entries. Print entries are spread out on tables by category. Most categories require several room setups. Each juror views the entries independently. Any juror can put an entry into the final voting by picking it up from the table. Digital entries are selected by checking an "in" or "out" column on prepared scoring sheets. For finals, all five jurors work as a single team. In one hall, print entries are again spread out on tables by category. Two paper cups, one white and one red, with slots cut in the bottom, are placed upside down to the right of each entry. White cups are for "in" votes, red cups for "out." Each juror votes with different colored ceramic tiles by putting his or her tile in the appropriate cup. After all the jurors finish voting on print, they move to another hall for digital files. Again, voting is done by each juror checking the "in" or "out" column on scoring sheets. Meanwhile, in the print hall, if the votes do not total nine, a check of the tile colors tells the Communication Arts staff which juror has inadvertently missed that piece and he or she is called back to vote. After the judges make their selections, their votes are tallied. A simple majority is usually required for a finalist to be selected a winner.

Illustration Competition

Jury: 5
Days of Judging: 2

The judging process is a two-part system: screening and finals. In screening, the jurors are divided into multiple groups and each category is distributed equally amongst them. Judges are not permitted to vote on work they were directly involved in. In order to move to the final round an entry must get a majority vote of a screening group. Each juror views the entries independently. Print entries are spread out on rows of tables and digital media is projected on a large screen. For the final round the judges are brought back together as one group. Each judge votes "in" or "out" on each entry. After the judges make their selections, their votes are tallied. A simple majority is usually required for a finalist to be selected a winner.

Interactive Competition

Jury: 5
Days of Judging: 2 (plus additional time screening prior to arriving at our offices)

The judging process is a two-part system: screening and finals. In screening, the jurors are divided into multiple groups and each category is distributed equally amongst them. Bundles of disk-based entries and lists of URLs were sent to the jurors for evaluation in their offices. Jurors are not permitted to vote on work they were directly involved in. In order to move to the final round an entry must get a majority vote of a screening group. Finals were held in our offices using multiple workstations with a T-1 networked connection to evaluate Web-based entries. Disk-based entries were delivered over our networked-based NAS server. A simple majority is usually required for a finalist to be selected a winner.

Photography Competition

Jury: 5
Days of Judging: 2

The judging process is a two-part system: screening and finals. In screening, the jurors are divided into multiple groups and each category is distributed equally amongst them. Judges are not permitted to vote on work they were directly involved in. In order to move to the final round an entry must get a majority vote of a screening group. Each juror views the entries independently. Print entries are spread out on rows of tables and digital media is projected on a large screen. For the final round the judges are brought back together as one group. Each judge votes "in" or "out" on each entry. After the judges make their selections, their votes are tallied. A simple majority is usually required for a finalist to be selected a winner.

Typography Competition

Jury: 3
Days of Judging: 2

The judging process is a two-part system: screening and finals. In screening, each juror views the entries independently. Print entries are spread out on rows of tables and digital media is projected on a large screen. In order to move to the final round an entry must receive a majority vote of the jurors. Judges are not permitted to vote on work they were directly involved in. In the final round, each judge votes "in" or "out" on each entry. After the judges make their selections, their votes are tallied. A simple majority is usually required for a finalist to be selected a winner.