Amnesty International Hong Kong pop-up bookstore Exhibit

Amnesty International Hong Kong pop-up bookstore

The bookstore, by Brand Union and Ogilvy & Mather Hong Kong, protests the rise of unjust censorship in Hong Kong.

In Hong Kong, Article 27 protects residents from being unjustly censored by the state. But censorship still silences many, says Amnesty International Hong Kong. To shine a light on the recent disappearances of local booksellers in Hong Kong and the sweeping violations of residents’ freedom of expression, the nonprofit organization partnered with global design consultancy Brand Union and ad agency Ogilvy & Mather Hong Kong to launch a pop-up bookstore in central Hong Kong. Part of the nonprofit’s Every Freedom Needs a Fighter campaign, the bookstore featured more than 1000 redacted books.

“Censorship and self-censorship are on the rise, and people’s freedoms are being challenged,” says Mabel Au, director of Amnesty International Hong Kong. “We hope to address this deeply concerning issue through the installation and hope that the people of Hong Kong not only keep this top of mind, but also continue to have a voice and defend our freedom of expression.”

In addition to the bookstore, the campaign includes a redacted website for the free nonprofit online newspaper Hong Kong Free Press, as well as a series of time-lapsed short films showing artists sketching controversial moments in history. Played in reverse, these moments are undrawn to emphasize their message: “When rights vanish, so does the truth.”

“Like everywhere, Hong Kong’s liberties are at stake, and with the recent disappearances of local booksellers, we felt that the truth, and our right to express it, is something we should all fight for,” says Andy Reynolds, creative director for Brand Union. “The bookstore, redacted site and films are vehicles for us to showcase what a future without Article 27 might look like.”

brandunion.com

ogilvy.com

 

PreLoader

Create an Account
Subscribe
Sign In

Subscribe
Sign In