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Art directors have portrayed photographer George Simhoni as having the ability to bring life and humanity to his work and to tell a story with a single image. As a result of his vast experience, he has the ability and confidence to pull-off a technically challenging production and deliver a seamless image at the end of the day. Simhoni’s philosophy, however, is that if you plan the shoot well beforehand, you have the time to allow the magic to happen. He’s been recognized as a leader in the field of photography and has won numerous awards during his career.

04.14.09

Nothing Is Sacred

If you have a degree in what field is it? No degree. A diploma from Sheridan College in Canada.

What was your strangest assignment? I have had many over the past 30 some odd years. How about photographing for a hotel chain with no hotel facilities? It was a hole in the ground and a concept only. We were not to show specific locations, architecture, facilities, props, people or activities yet still show a cross section of people having fun. And another time working for a global hotel chain, the assignment was to photograph a beachfront hotel in Bermuda from 100 meters off the ocean. The only problem is that there are no helicopter services available in Bermuda (don’t ask me why, I guess it’s too small to need them). I hired a Rasta and his parasail boat and photographed the hotel from the above. It worked.

Which photographer would you like to meet? Eliott Erwitt, Nadav Kander, Irving Penn and Horst P. Horst.

What famous person (living or dead) would you most like to photograph? Ben Gurion. He was a true visionary.

Aside from your camera and lighting, what item could you not work without? My glasses and Photoshop.

Is there anything you would not digitally retouch? I am not a documentary photographer, I’m a frustrated illustrator with a penchant for weaving my own stories, so nothing is sacred.

From where do your best ideas originate? Visual input and stimulation, traveling around, art galleries, watching people interact, odd situations and scenery.

How do you overcome a creative block? Go somewhere far away and get lost in the visuals of it all.

Do you have creative pursuits other than photography? No. I’ve tried music and both painting and illustration. I have found that photography fulfills my quest.

What music are you listening to right now? Wilco.

What’s your approach to balancing work and life? After many years of having no balance, I have slowed down. I now workout, bike, ski, hike and try to do adventure travel with Lyn, my wife.

What’s your favorite quote? Can't say I have one.

Do you have any advice for people just entering the profession? I highly recommend studying art history and paintings. Learn composition as an art student.

What’s one thing you wish you knew when you started your career?
There is a world outside that I have not discovered.