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Interactive Annual 16:
experimental

Nokia viNe

Launch Movie

“This is the next frontier of local, social content. I like the way it organically records a stream of experiences that can be played back and shared.” —Ingrid Bernstein

“Seeing this rich-media mobile device and its associated applications in action makes me want to use them. It’s playful and robust, another great step towards blurring the line between the digital and physical worlds, adding new dimension and ease to people’s digital social media experiments.” —Hilary Read


Overview: This campaign experience supported the launch of the Nokia N96. Nokia viNe is a breakthrough mobile application that records photos, videos, songs, text and voice while geo-tagging them to an online multimedia map of the user’s life. It’s the ultimate travelogue tool and an easy way to relive, search and share in real-time one’s experiences just as they happen. Useful and aesthetically beautiful, it doesn’t ask people to do something fundamentally new (they take pictures, listen to music, and write text as they move about every day); instead it connects these events and effortlessly journalizes them using a visual language that is elegant and brand appropriate.

  • • The user experience was originally constructed for the mobile application and then applied to build an integrated Web interface and a social-media widget.
  • • As users move throughout their day, a vine traces their path on a map; the media they use during their journey becomes the leaves on the vine. This functional metaphor has the emotional connotations for a useable, intuitive interface—the brand design becomes the experience.

Comments by James Temple

Was the topic/subject of the project a new one for you? “R/GA and Nokia had been exploring location-based services within marketing campaigns for a couple of years before Nokia viNe. We started with a campaign called Urbanista Diaries that in many ways was an alpha experiment in both marketing and technology that paved the way for Nokia viNe.”

What was the most challenging aspect of the project? “In an era where mobile phones are fast taking the persona of computers, we were very conscious that the actual device interface is getting more cluttered and complicated, so we wanted to generate a software experience that had the inherent qualities of simplicity, community and value—true to Nokia’s reputation. We had in mind an experience where the mobile interface becomes incredibly minimal and focused on contextual exploration versus user initiated creation and consumption. At the same time, the project had enormous technical complexities, so one of our primary challenges was to mask the technology, leaving behind just a simple, enjoyable and immersive digital experience.”

What did you have in mind when you began this project? “Mobile phones carry data (music, photos, locations) that’s definitive of the personality of the owner of the device. All of it can empower a mobile application to ‘understand’ the user. For example, someone sits on a beach watching the sunset. Based on their phone’s data, the person is served a playlist of music from other people who have sat on that same spot at a similar time and left their music experience for others to enjoy. That’s what we had in mind for Nokia viNe.”

Credits

Gustav Arnetz/Ennio Franco/Rasmus Knutsson, graphic designers
Neil Starr, writer
Kathrin Hoffmann, interactive designer
Virgilio Santos, design director
Nathalie Huni, associate creative director
Carla Echevarria, creative director
James Temple, executive creative director
Luane Kohnke/Darren Savage, strategic planners
Marc Shillum, senior brand strategist
Michael Potts, developer
Ben Doran/Nicolas Le Pallec/Ozay Olkan/Jolyon Russ/ Tomas Vorobjov, Flash programmers
Kevin Sutherland, technical lead
Krystal-Joy Williams, associate producer
Dylan Connerton, senior producer
Anthony Wickham, production manager
Neil Duggan, quality assurance
R/GA London (London, United Kingdom), project design and development
Nokia, client


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