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Interactive Annual 19:
Environmental

IBM THINK Exhibit

Launch Movie

“The massive scale of this awe-inspiring IBM installation parallels the vast improvements technology continues to make to our world.” —Dave Curry

“Through the use of dynamic data visualization, beautifully shot imagery and Cinder, this set the bar for immersive interactive touchscreen installations for 2012. I took my team to this exhibit to see it firsthand and left wishing I had worked on it.”
—Madison Wharton Marks


Overview: Commissioned by IBM in honor of its 100th anniversary, with a debut in New York’s Lincoln Center in September 2011, THINK was both an exploration of the idea of progress and a high-level expression of IBM’s role in the world. Diverse audiences—from scientists and heads of state to school kids and everyday citizens—joined in a larger conversation about how people are making the world work better through innovation. Three distinct experiences—real-time data visualization of New York City systems tracked and mapped on a 128-foot digital wall, a 10-minute film played in an immersive field of 40 digital panels, and interactive modules—formed a multimedia exhibit that helped visitors understand the history of human progress and innovation.

  • •The exhibit took more than a year to develop and produce. Hurricane Irene forced the installation to be taken down and rebuilt two days before launch.
  • • The exhibit featured 100 hours of footage captured over 7 countries, 10 streams of video for a 14-minute immersive film and 1.2 million pixels of data visualization on a 128 x 12-foot wall.
  • • THINK received more than 25,000 visitors during its 1-month run. IBM polled visitors and found that more than 70 percent of adults felt inspired to think more about making the world work better.

Comments by Mirada

What was the most challenging aspect of the project? “Most challenging was seamlessly integrating all three components (the data wall, film and the interactive stations), but equally demanding was creating the exhibit in Lincoln Center, an unusual space for a large-scale interactive exhibit.”

What applications were used that you hadn’t used before? “The data visualization wall was custom pixel-perfect programmed for this exhibit. The interactive stations were coded from scratch; each was designed for operation using natural movements and supportive of ADA accessibility standards. Infrared sensors were mounted to the front of the plasmas screens, and each 85-inch screen transformed into an interactive touch platform with interactive content for visitors to navigate and explore. In essence, they became giant tablet computers.”

Credits

Jonathan Wu, art director
Stuart Luman/Jeff O’Brien, writers
Carl DeTorres/Josh Hartley/Becky Hui/Heui Jin Jo/Rosanna Vitiello, graphic designers
Andri Klausen/Carlos Rodriguez, 3-D designers
James Cathcart, design director
David Fowler, associate creative director
Kaan Atilla/Jesus de Francisco/Nicolas Maitret/Susana Rodriguez de Tembleque/Ben Roth, creative directors
Mathew Cullen/Susana Rodriguez de Tembleque, executive creative directors
Ralph Appelbaum/Javier Jimenez/Nicolas Maitret, principals
David Wicks, programmer
Ilona Parkansky, developer
Fred Fouquet/Bryan Keith/Lenny Mesina, editors
Guillermo Navarro, director of photography
Mathew Cullen, director
Fiona Bruder, executive director
Ernesto Lomeli, contributing video artist
Money Mark, composer
Rob Newman, line producer
Lilly Preston, senior producer
Javier Jimenez/Alex Vlack, executive producers
Sabrina Clark/Sarah Frantz/Caitlin Mennen-Bobula/Andrew Merkin, project managers
John Fragomeni, visual effects director
Mark Renton, Flame artist
Andy Cochrane/Jonah Hall/Zach Tucker, visual effects supervisors
Casey Reas/Keith Yamashita, consultants
George P. Johnson, curator
MTh (Motion Theory), production company
Ralph Appelbaum Associates Inc., project design and development
Mirada (Los Angeles, CA)/SYPartners, design firms
IBM, client


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