Editor’s Column

We received 4,918 entries to this year’s Advertising Annual including 1,034 TV spots—refuting predictions by various media pundits on the imminent demise of this particular form of advertising and resulting in a strong showing in this year’s annual, not to mention a lasting impression on our judges.

Go to Jurors Biographies

“That MTV Bird spot from La Communidad,” juror Mark Fitzloff remembered. “I laughed out loud and Diet Coke came out of my nose.”

“I was humbled by the sheer amount of work in front of us,” juror Susan Alinsangan said. “When I look at all of those ads, I see thousands of briefs, tens of thousands of meetings, conference calls, hundreds of shoots, millions of hours of editing, countless late nights, going back to the well over and over, fighting, losing, fighting, winning, approvals, choosing fonts, colors, sizing logos (bigger), compositing, threading the legal needle and cost consultants.”

“Judging a great show makes you jealous,” said juror Brian Brooker. “It was a momentous kick-in-the-rear. I appreciated seeing so many smart, integrated campaigns in which every touch point was carefully considered.”

Several judges commented on the large amount of Canadian entries this year. This can best be explained by Canada’s more stringent bank regulations, which prevented a mortgage meltdown and subprime crisis as we experienced in the U.S., and resulted in  a more robust recovery for the Canadian economy.

When asked what was new, juror James Mikus saw some good solutions using new media. “It appears that people are getting increasingly comfortable with it,” he said. Juror Mylene Pollock commented, “New ideas like Best Buy’s Twelp Force are exciting, but have a hard time finding a home within existing categories. As marketers we need to work harder to create and reward work that’s outside of the box.”

“Not surprisingly, the best ideas were the simplest. The biggest ideas didn’t always have the biggest budgets.” —Brian Brooker

When asked about disappointments, radio was again cited by several jurors for not reaching its creative potential. “It’s a shame there was only one great radio campaign,” Alinsangan said. “Someone once told me radio was the only advertising medium you could enjoy while driving your car or with your eyes closed. I’ve always liked radio for that.” Brooker added, “I realize it’s hard to write, but the opportunity is there.”

Disappointment was also expressed over the shortcomings of the now ubiquitous campaign documentary video.

“People have a hard time telling complicated stories,” Pollock said. “The work was often better than the way it was presented to the judges. We need to get better at boiling these stories down to their simplest forms.”

“The length of an award show video is inversely proportional to that entry’s chances of winning an award,” Fitzloff said. “It shouldn’t work that way, but let’s be honest, it does.”

When asked about future directions, juror John Stapleton felt that the ad industry is still playing catch up to the rapidly expanding media landscape. “Things are changing and moving too fast for the standard advertising model to be put in place,” he said. “It’s not a negative thing, it’s a reality thing. Things will evolve and adapt and eventually catch up but at this pace, we all need to keep reinventing the path to do it.”

“One obvious answer is social media,” Mikus said. “Specifically the distinction between paid and earned media, and the huge opportunities that exist with the latter. I also think agencies will continue to be asked to do more with less and with better results. That’s not necessarily a bad thing.”

“Big, simple, strong ideas that change human behavior are more important than ever.” —Mylene Pollock

“Products will be made and advertising will always be there to promote them,” Stapleton concluded. “The key is the how and where. Brands that deny the participation from their consumers will suffer and wither away. But the brands that use their consumers as a media path will dominate in the years to come.”

As in previous years, we employed a two-step jurying system, screening and finals. For screening, the jurors worked in teams of three (Jean Coyne and I acted as the eighth and ninth screening jurors due to last-minute cancellations), screening one third of the television, print and projected entries in one of three halls equipped with broadcast equipment and six rows of tables for print. Print entries were spread out on the tables by category and each juror reviewed the entries independently. Any juror could put an entry into the next round by handing it to a member of our staff. Television, radio, integrated and digital entries were screened by checking an “in” or “out” box on scoring sheets.

After all the entries were screened, we combined the selections from the three teams for finals. During the finals, all seven judges worked as a single team. In one hall, print entries were spread out on tables by category. Two paper cups, one white and one red, with slots cut in the bottom, were placed upside down to the right of each entry, white cups for “in” votes, red cups for “out.” Each juror voted by placing a different colored ceramic tile into the appropriate cup. A check of the tile colors ensured that every judge voted on every single piece.

After all the jurors were finished voting on the print setup, they moved to another hall for a final session of TV, radio, projected images or integrated campaigns. Online advertising was judged on a bank of computers in another location in our office. Again voting was done by each juror checking the “in” or “out” column on the scoring sheets.

Judges were not permitted to vote on projects in which they were directly involved. When judges’ pieces were in the finals, Jean or I voted in their stead.

I would like to extend our grateful appreciation to our jurors for their conscientious efforts in selecting our 51st annual exhibition. —Patrick Coyne ca
 

Jurors Biographies

landing-image

Susan Alinsangan

Art Director

NULL

Susan Alinsangan is a freelance art director in Santa Monica. She attended Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles and built her portfolio at The Bookshop. That got her into TBWA\Chiat\Day where she spent the next eleven years. Most notably, Alinsangan is the art director behind the iPod silhouette campaign, one of TBWA\Chiat\Day's most successful global campaigns in a long history of creating cultural icons. Among her honors are Cannes Gold/Bronze Lions, Grand Kelly, Grand Effie (twice), Obie Hall of Fame, Gold/Silver ADC, Gold Clio, Bronze Andy, D&AD, The One Show, One Show Design, Communication Arts Advertising Annual, Archive, Graphis Photo, CBS's Top Ten Super Bowl Spots of the Decade, Advertising Age's Best Spots of the Decade, Adweek's Best Spots and Best Outdoor of the Decade. In collaboration with her favorite partner, husband and fellow art director, Brian Doyle, she thinks her best work is their son Owen, but so far, no award.

landing-image

Brian Brooker

Creative Director

NULL

Brian Brooker, formerly executive creative director at Barkley in Kansas City for the last seven years, is a nationally recognized creative leader and expert in the advertising industry. His work as writer and creative director has helped build brands like Rolling Stone, PGA Tour, Southwest Airlines and Sonic Drive In. He's won hundreds of prestigious awards, including Andys, Archive, Cannes, Clio, Communications Arts, Effies, D&AD, National Addies, Mercury and The One Show. He's written articles for Advertising Age, served on the AAAA board, spoken at their events and developed a Creativity Symposium in which he attracted a roster of prominent creative thinkers who share his belief that "great ideas can come from anywhere."

landing-image

Mark Fitzloff

Executive Creative Director

Wieden+Kennedy

Mark Fitzloff is an executive creative director at Wieden+Kennedy, in Portland, Oregon. Fitzloff was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and lived there just long enough to claim Midwestern roots before moving to San Francisco. He started his career in Boston working on AT&T and FedEx and then moved back to California and a job on Microsoft. Fitzloff came to Wieden+Kennedy as a copywriter in 1999 writing spots for AOL, AltaVista, Siemens and Nike, but it was working on Coca-Cola that he found his true talent, breathing fresh life into iconic American brands. This talent served him well as creative director on Old Spice. His ability to create work that both wins awards and pushes the client's bottom line was similarly felt as creative director on Powerade and Careerbuilder.com and led to his promotion to executive creative director of the Portland office in 2008. Fitzloff and his wife Courtney have a son named Max and a daughter named Mia.

landing-image

James Mikus

Executive Creative Director

McGarrah Jessee

James Mikus is co-executive creative director of McGarrah Jessee in Austin, Texas. He joined McJ in 1999 and has helped the agency grow from 15 to 70 employees, outgrow two buildings and win Advertising Age's Southwestern Agency of the Year for 2009. Mikus works on, and oversees, everything from integrated campaigns to store design for all of McGarrah Jessee's clients including Shiner Beer, Frost Bank, Whataburger and Costa Del Mar. His work has been recognized by The Athena Awards, Communication Arts, Graphis, The OBIES, The One Show, and Print and he has also enjoyed stints at GSD&M, DDB and The Richards Group. He lives in Austin with his wife Lisa, their sons Matt and Will and their dog Trapper.

landing-image

Mylene Pollock

Creative Director

Leo Burnett, Chicago

Mylene Pollock is a creative director at Leo Burnett, Chicago. She has created and shaped ideas for over 25 years in this ever-changing, never boring business. She's been fortunate enough to have worked at Ogilvy & Mather New York, Euro RSCG and Hal Riney & Partners. In those various incarnations she worked on Allstate, Cotton, Inc., Dove, Hallmark, IBM, Kellogg's and P&G. Awards and recognition include Addys, Archive, The Art Directors Club, Cannes, Clios, Communication Arts, D&AD, Effies and The One Show. Pollock has a degree in Visual Communications from the University of Delaware and has received the University's Presidential Citation for Outstanding Achievement. She has two sons and spends her spare time watching little league, chaperoning regattas and squeezing in a soup kitchen whenever possible.

landing-image

John Stapleton

Chief Creative Director

22squared

John Stapleton is the chief creative director at 22squared in Atlanta, Georgia. He graduated from the Art Institute of Philadelphia in 1993 and burst into the logo and brochure scene with a serious eighteen hour-a-day work habit. Once that burned out, he took a crack at advertising at James Bunting Advertising in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. A few agencies later, and further down the eastern coast, he ended up at WestWayne in Tampa, Florida as a senior art director. Eight years later, the company changed its name to 22squared and promoted Stapleton to chief creative director on the majority of its accounts and relocated him, his wife Becky and their two daughters Maia and Amelia to Atlanta. His work has been recognized by numerous industry publications, including Archive, Communication Arts and Graphis as well as The Effies and The One Show.

landing-image

Mary Webb

Executive Vice President/Group Creative Director

Arnold Worldwide

Mary Webb is an executive vice president, group creative director at Arnold Worldwide in Boston. She's worked on The Harford, Progressive Insurance, Talbots and on the Tyson Foods accounts among others. Prior to Arnold, she cut her advertising teeth working on John Hancock's, Real Life, Real Answers campaign at Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos. From there she headed to Anderson & Lembke in New York. She could only take the Yankee-loving New Yorkers for so long before heading back to Boston and Arnold Worldwide. She's had work featured in D&AD, Effie, The New York Art Director's Club and The One Show. When she's not directing creatives, she's directing her husband and three teenaged children.

landing-image

Guy Bommarito

writer/creative director

freelance

Guy Bommarito is a freelance writer/creative director in San Francisco. Prior to that, he spent two years with Foote, Cone & Belding in Chicago where he discovered the true meaning of winter. He is probably best known for his tenure at GSD&M where, as executive creative director, he led the agency to its first honors in the Andys, Cannes, Communication Arts, D&AD, the New York Art Directors Club, The One Show and the Radio Mercury Awards. In addition, he's taught advertising creativity and campaign courses at his alma mater, the University of Texas at Austin. He lives with one beautiful wife and three amazing young daughters.

landing-image

Hélene Côté

creative director

freelance

Hélene Côté, a freelance creative director in the San Francisco Bay Area, was most recently a creative director at DDB in Los Angeles. She was an associate creative director at TBWA\Chiat Tequila and also worked for Rapp Collins, Foote, Cone & Belding and Saatchi & Saatchi. Côté feels her biggest accomplishment as creative director was winning an Emmy for the Ameriquest Super Bowl campaign. In addition, her work has been recognized by AICP, Belding, Cannes, Clios, Communication Arts, London International and The One Show. A graduate of Dawson College in Montréal, Québec, Canada, Côté has shown her limited-edition serigraphs throughout North America and Europe, including the Salon D’Automne in Paris.

landing-image

Jim Henderson

art director

freelance

Jim Henderson was with Martin/Williams in Minneapolis for 23 years, as executive vice president and group creative director/art director. During that time he was lead creative on LL Bean, Cargill, Coleman, Marvin Windows, Polaris and many others. One of the things he’s proudest of is that even as his management responsibilities grew during those years, he was always able to do what he loved most—being an art director. His work has been recognized by virtually every major awards competition, including the Andys, Art Directors Club of New York, Clios, Communication Arts, The One Show and multiple Stephen E. Kelly finalists. He is currently directing his talents towards pro-bono efforts (the most rewarding work a creative person can do), freelance art direction and photography.

landing-image

Paul Little

creative director

TBWA\Vancouver

Paul Little is creative director for TBWA\Vancouver. He joined TBWA from DDB Vancouver where he enjoyed a ten-year stretch working with some of Canada's hall of fame ad people. Along the way he collected numerous awards, including Cannes Lions, Clios, Communication Arts Awards of Excellence and One Show Pencils. He's also been regularly named one of Canada's top writers according to Strategy magazine’s creative report card. Under his direction, TBWA\Vancouver is one of the top creative shops in Canada winning every major national award and selected for inclusion in Communication Arts, D&AD, London International Awards and The One Show. When not hanging out with his daughter Frances or at his desk, he can occasionally be seen riding his snowboard up at Whistler.

landing-image

Maureen Shirreff

creative director

Ogilvy & Mather, Chicago

Maureen Shirreff, creative director at Ogilvy & Mather, Chicago, never took an advertising class. "I was a theater major at Northwestern." She did, however, grow up as the second oldest of eight kids on Chicago's South Side. "Trust me, you really learn persuasion, listening and compromise when you are part of a big Irish-Catholic family." Her career has taken her to BBDO, DDB, Foote Cone & Belding, Tatham-Laird & Kudner and Ogilvy. In 2000, Rick Boyko, head of Ogilvy NA, asked Shirreff to take on a pillar Ogilvy brand, Dove. The Campaign for Real Beauty has received every major industry award and provoked a ground swell of debate about society's definition of beauty. It also sold lots of product.

landing-image

Steve Simpson

partner/creative director

Goodby, Silverstein & Partners

Steve Simpson is a partner and creative director at Goodby, Silverstein & Partners in San Francisco. After DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, Simpson went to grad school at the University of Chicago. He began his advertising career in Chicago at the now-defunct agency Marsteller, Inc. He next spent six years at Hal Riney & Partners before joining GS&P in 1990. At GS&P, Simpson has worked on such diverse accounts as HP, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Emerald Nuts, the Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, Nike, Porsche, the NBA, Norwegian Cruise Line and Chevys Mexican Restaurants. Simpson’s work has won every major industry award several times over and he has served on the juries of numerous competitions, including the Clios, Communication Arts, Effies, MPA Kelly Awards and The One Show.

landing-image

Ellen Steinberg

partner/group creative director

McKinney

Ellen Steinberg currently is a partner and group creative director at McKinney in Durham, North Carolina. Steinberg began her advertising career as an art director at New York’s Korey Kay & Partners in 1990 and continued on to Weiss Whitten Carroll Stagliano and eventually to Fallon McElligott, where she spent five years. After leaving Fallon, Steinberg spent several years freelancing––at Fallon, Wieden and Cliff Freeman. Steinberg rejoined Fallon (New York) as creative director from 2002–3. Steinberg’s work has been featured in Cannes, Communication Arts, D&AD, the Kellys and The One Show. In her spare time, she is a devoted yogi, poet and reverend—to date, she has officiated seven weddings.

landing-image

Carter Weitz

president of creative development

Bailey Lauerman

Carter Weitz is president of creative development at Bailey Lauerman in Lincoln, Nebraska. Weitz started his career at Bailey Lauerman after earning a BFA from Iowa State University in graphic design. From there he spent a couple of years at Bernstein-Rein in Kansas City creating national work for Wal-Mart and Blockbuster. In 1991, Weitz moved back to Lincoln and rejoined Bailey Lauerman as associate creative director where he has “stayed put” since. His award-winning work has been recognized by the Art Directors Club of New York, Cannes, Communication Arts , OBIE Awards and The One Show. Weitz lives in Lincoln with his wife, Tami, their three sons and their golden retriever, Frisco.

Create an Account
Subscribe
Sign In

Subscribe
Sign In