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Responses by TBWA\Media Arts Lab

Background: AirPods are one of Apple’s most popular products, and at the core of Apple’s long and powerful history with music. Each year, we try to remind people about how magical AirPods are as a product, and how magical listening to your music on them makes you feel.

Reasoning: We believe the right ingredients for culture-defining audio work are “music and movement and art.” A great track, an interesting form of performance, movement or dance, and done in a fresh and artful way. This goes all the way back to the original iPod silhouette ads. Each time we do a new project, we look at many ideas and try to see if they measure up to those three ingredients to see if it feels like something we haven’t seen and would want to watch. This time, it happened to be Double Dutch, but with things that weren’t ropes.

Challenges: Making “Jump” would have been a production feat in normal times. But making it in the current state of the world with remote production was especially challenging. We were lucky to have great production partners and great clients who rolled with every twist and turn along the way to get to a great finished piece.

Visual influences: We were inspired by the cinematography of Spike Lee’s film Do the Right Thing, Jamel Shabazz’s street photography of New York City in the ’80s and a bit of Larry Clark’s film Kids once we got into the grade. Almost 16mm–like, slightly desaturated and full of texture, with a uniquely colorful palette supplied by the streets of the city.

Specific demands: Every Double Dutch moment in the one-minute forty-second film was real and done practically, with professional jumpers and rope handlers, except they weren’t always using rope. So, it took a lot of rehearsal time to get our main talent, Kengo Sugino, and all our rope handlers to not only become comfortable with each other from a timing standpoint, but also to get used to Double Dutching with cables, ribbons, neon light tubing and white basketball tape.

Anything new: We learned that if you are going to do remote shooting, it’s best to shoot in a place that is somewhat close to your time zone.

mediaartslab.com

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