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In an age when people worship at the altar of celebrity, General Electric (GE) instead honors the world’s great scientists—especially its women scientists. It’s why GE has committed to having women working in at least 20,000 of its science and technology roles by the year 2020. GE is also starting a number of initiatives to retain female employees—extended maternity leave, subsidized childcare, total salary transparency—and sponsoring programs to encourage more girls to take an interest in STEM subjects.

To launch these initiatives, BBDO New York created a short film depicting a world where female scientists are stars. The film focuses on Millie Dresselhaus, who in 1990 became the first woman to win the National Medal of Science in engineering. In the ad agency’s alternate world, the 86-year-old physicist gets hounded by paparazzi, pursued by fans wanting selfies and interviewed on talk shows. She also finds herself turned into an emoji, a doll, a piece of street art and a Halloween costume.

Appropriately, nearly all the crew involved in the making of the film were also women, from Hollywood director Nicole Holofcener to editor Charlie Harvey and her all-female editorial crew to producer Angela Narloch to colorist Maria Carretero. It’s these women who helped shine the spotlight on Dresselhaus, in turn demonstrating GE’s belief that any company that works to change the world should also reflect it.

bbdo.nyc

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