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David Gilkey, NPR, photographer
Mito Habe-Evans, NPR, editor
Jason Beaubien, NPR, sound engineer
Claire O'Neill, NPR, producer
Thousands of quake survivors who've tired of living in camps have started building their own homes. A few miles outside Port-au-Prince is a government-established camp for displaced people—Camp Corail, the only 'official' camp in Haiti. Just past Corail, a more 'organic' community has sprouted. Nearly 100,000 squatters have taken to the hills. NPR photographer David Gilkey spent a day wandering the community of Cabaret with a tilt-shift lens. "Squatting in Hillside Hati" 1:20 David Gilkey (VO): We drove out past the airport, and there must be 100,000 people who have moved up onto that hill. Unbelievable. It looks like a mini Port-au-Prince, and we just walked through there. It's an organic birth of a new town, for lack of a better term. It's sort of off the radar of any of the NGOs. There's not offical help there. People are doing it themselves. So the sense I got is that there's much more pride in what they're doing. There's dentists, there's minimarts, there's water shops, a mini Home Depot: logs, rebar, cement. Pretty much everything you could possibly need that you would find in any neighborhood has popped up there. It has a view of the ocean, they're planting trees, they're making a life for themselves out there."
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