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TED has become synonymous with its tagline, “ideas worth spreading,” and there is no better place for spreading ideas than the web. The new TED.com, designed by digital agency Huge and developed by TED, began as a collaborative working process in late November 2012. The TED team joined Huge’s Brooklyn office several times a week for the first few months, and as the project progressed, Huge went through several rounds of design sketches, prototyping and user-testing with TED to iterate on the design.

The end product of this long process is a more customizable experience of TED. Personal accounts let users save talks with a “watch later” button, and even if you forget to save a talk, signing in to your account gives you access to your history, so it’s easy to find talks you’ve watched before. A brand-new video player offers high-quality full-screen viewing of HD footage as well as the option to explore related content without interrupting playback. When you scroll down the page while watching a talk, a thumbnail of the video stays pinned to the top of the page and continues to play while you check out the information below. You can also read along with the talk with an auto-scrolling transcript, and volunteer translators have made transcripts available in more than 100 different languages. When designing the navigation, Huge aimed to consolidate the site’s many links according to the five things people most often come to the site to do: watch, read, attend, participate and find out more about TED. It’s easier than ever to access this hub of ideas, and now you can even watch them spread—every time you share a talk, a “track your influence” feature keeps tabs on how many people watched the video on your suggestion.
TED.com

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